Masala Papad

Masala Papad

 

Do you quickly devour the papad appetizer at Indian restaurants even before the server has had the chance to put it on your table?

Well, then you are going to love this recipe and you might never look at papad the same way ever again!

It has been a long time since I have posted a recipe for an Indian dish. Indian food is part of my daily life! I love the spices, the flavors and all the variety that it is known for.

“Indian food is great tasting and good for the soul.” Every day, I climb to my rooftop just so I can shout that phrase on top of my lungs. People walking below just stare at me and think of me as the crazy lady.

They, however, nod in agreement.

Cooking Indian food comes easy to me. I don’t have to think about it.  All the methodologies and steps have been deeply ingrained into me since childhood.  Not to brag, but, I am sure I can cook it with one hand tied behind my back!

Masala Papad Ingredients

So, I take the time to create some non-Indian dishes. This blog, in one way, is to force me to get out of my comfort zone. It has become a way for me to experiment with ingredients to see what will work and what will not work.

That hasn’t stopped me from bringing some Indian Spices to classic dishes from other cultures. Remember the Carmon seeds used in Fried Green Tomatillos? That recipe has been a huge success with my readers.

Masala Papad

For this recipe, I am going to make something my mother used to make. This is in honor of her very recent birthday which was very special to both of us. This was the first time, in over ten years, that I had wished her a Happy Birthday. We had a falling out years ago and only recently reconnected.

That is a story for another day….

Every Sunday, during my formidable years, masala papad was a staple on the dinner table. For Sunday dinner, there would be masala papad, masala chips (masala french fries) and Mom would make her INFAMOUS samosas.

fried-papad-2

My mother’s samosas are just as legendary as her masala papad. The samosas are slightly larger than bite-size and the perfect equilateral triangles! If you took your protractor to it, you would notice that all the angles are exactly 60 degrees!

She made her samosas from the bottom up. She would never DREAM of using store bought samosa “shells”. Even now, when we are at Indian restaurants, both of us will let out a simultaneous loud grunt at the sight of the restaurant’s samosas.  They are bulky, have no shape and drenched in oil.

Don’t worry, someday soon, I will get her to help guest write a blog post with her recipe for equilateral samosas. I am working on her slowly and I am sure I am wearing her down.

Masala Papad

I want the whole world to see her perfect samosas.

This masala papad is her recipe with one variation. My recipe includes mango. Mango came about quite accidentally after I added it instead of onions.

Talk about happy accidents!

If you are worried about eating fried food, then, this recipe works great with roasted papad instead.  Tastes just as good.

My favorite recipes from my mother are her masala papad and her samosas. What recipe of your mother do you remember the most?

Masala Papad

Recipe Details (Makes 3 Masala Papads)

Total time to prepare – 20 minutes

Ingredients

- 3 Papads (can be purchased from any Indian grocery stores or online)

-  1/2 English cucumber (I like this cucumber, but, you can use any cucumbers)

-  1/2 of a small Red Onion

-  1/2 of small, ripe mango

-  4-5 not-ripe cherry tomatoes

-  1/2 cup corn (you can use frozen, just make sure it is dry)

-  4 leaves of coriander

-  1/2 tsp Chaat masala or to taste (can also be found in Indian stores or online)

-  1 Thai Chili or Jalapeno (optional)

-  Salt to taste

-  Crushed black pepper to taste

-  1/2 tsp of Cayenne pepper

-  1/2 of a lemon for garnishing

-  3 cups of vegetable oil (adjust according to your frying pan shape and size)

Pre-preparation

-  Chop the cucumber, onion, chili and tomatoes finely. Make them as small as you can get them

-  Chop the coriander leaves

-  In your frying pan, add the oil and set the heat to medium

Preparation

Frying the papad

-  Test the hotness of the oil by putting a very small piece of onion into the frying pan. If the oil jumps right up to the surface and there is heavy frizz, your oil is ready

-  Hold the papad with a pair of metal tongs and dip into the hot oil

-  Pull out the papad immediately.

-  Take a bowl or frying strainer and turn it upside down.  Place a paper towel on top of this upside down utensil.

-  Place the papad on top of the paper napkin and mold it into the shape of the bowl. Be careful because it will be hot. Use the tong to help adjust to the bowl shape.  Keep in mind that you will only be able to shape it while the papad is hot.

-  Don’t worry if you don’t get the perfect shape of the bowl or the strainer. The idea is to have raised sides and you should be able to get that shape easily

-  Allow the papad to cool while in this position.

-  Fry the remaining papads in the same way.

Roasting the papad

-  You can easily microwave the papad. Place a dry papad in the microwave and set it to 15 seconds. Microwave on each side for the same time. The time might vary depending on your microwave.

-  The best way to roast a papad is on the stove top. If you are daring enough, follow this step-by-step process outlined on Instructibles

Assembling the masala papad

-  In a mixing bowl, bring all the other ingredients together, except the lemon

-  Fill the papad bowls with this mixture and squeeze lemon juice on top.

An important thing to note here is that the papad will get very soggy almost immediately. So, only fill the papad at the very last minute.

You can serve this by itself or with green chutney.




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Comments

  1. says

    Our family has been watching Rick Stein’s cooking journey around India and the difference in cooking from one part of India to the next is quite different. I stay glued to the set. I would love this masala papad. I don’t cook Indian food without a lot of preparation, anticipation and rigorous checking that I’m doing it right. I need more practice, obviously.
    Maureen | Orgasmic Chef recently posted…Glazed Chocolate DonutsMy Profile

    • says

      Thank you so much Maureen. Indian food is not hard at all. You will get the hang of it after a couple of weeks. You will not regret it, trust me. Rick Steve’s entire series on India has been one of the most breathtaking series he has ever done. And it always makes me very hungry.

  2. Anita Daniels says

    This is a great recipe. I will always remember my mother’s apple cream pie. Tried to recreate it in my kitchen and never succeeded. Your pictures look great on a retina display

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